Categories
Memories

X-Men Collage

X-Men was a big part of my childhood and teenage years. I especially loved watching X-Men: The Animated Series on TV and collecting X-Men trading cards. I have recently found this collage that I made during my early teens.

Categories
Film & Media Studies Phenomenology

Siegfried Kracauer, Realist Film Theorist

by Jose Gutierrez III

Siegfried Kracauer was ‘as much a social scientist as a film theorist’ (Armstrong, 2007, p. 62). This is evident not just in Theory of Film: The Redemption of Physical Reality (Kracauer, 1960) but also in his (1) articles and reviews as a ‘practical film critic of the Frankfurter Zeitung’ (Petro, 1991, p. 131) of the 1920s and early 1930s; (2) in his book on ‘film sociology’ (Elsaesser, 1987, p. 67), From Caligari to Hitler: A Psychological Study of the German Film (Kracauer, 1947); and (3) in History, The Last Things before the Last (1969).

Categories
Memories

Finding a Path at the Crossroads of Meat Eating and Vegetarianism

Note: I submitted this manuscript on 20 October 2014 as my second essay to Professor Guang Xing of the University of Hong Kong, Centre of Buddhist Studies, for the BSTC6058 (Buddhism and Society) course, which I took as a cross-institutional elective for my PhD (Communication & Film Studies) programme at the Hong Kong Baptist University.

Introduction

Buddhism was founded by Gautama Buddha (563–483 B. C.) in India about 2,500 years ago (Cheng 2003, 19). During this time – India in the sixth century B. C. – ritual sacrifices that involved the taking of life were practiced (Horner 1967, 2). Two religious systems that flourished during these times, Jainism and Buddhism, took a firm stance “against the prevalence of practices which deprived creatures of life” (Horner 1967, 2). Protection of life lies at the core of the teachings of the Buddha. It occupies the first among five precepts that are considered binding on all who call themselves Buddhists: “1. Not to take the life of any living being; 2. Not to take what is not given; 3. Abstaining from sexual misconduct; 4. Abstaining from wrong speech; 5. Abstaining from intoxicants” (Dahlke et al. 1975, 3).